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Is Japan a city, state or country

Kwesta

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Where is Japan located

Founded by Emperor
: Hirohito (1926)

Area size of Japan: 143,574 sq mi (371,367 sq km)

Capital: Tokyo

Location Of Japan
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Japan is a country is an archipelago extending more than 1,744 miles that is approximate to (2,790km) from northeast to southwest in the Pacific, Japan is seperated from the east coast of Asia by the sea of Japan. it is approximately the size of Montana.

Japan's four main island are

Honshu

Honshu is Japan’s main island and home to most of the country’s major cities and cultural sites. On the east coast is the Japanese capital, Tokyo, a busy global hub for finance, industry, fashion and cuisine. Mount Fuji, an iconic, snow-capped volcano, lies southwest of the city. In central Honshu, the city of Kyoto is famed for its Zen temples, gardens lined with cherry blossoms and traditional geisha entertainment.

Hokkaido

Hokkaido, the northernmost of Japan’s main islands, is known for its volcanoes, natural hot springs (onsen) and ski areas. Rugged Daisetsuzan National Park is home to steaming, volcanic Mount Asahi. Shikotsu-Tōya National Park contains caldera lakes, geothermal springs and a Mount Fuji look-alike, Mount Yōtei. Popular ski resorts include Rusutsu, Furano and Niseko.

Kyushu

Kyushu, the southwesternmost of Japan’s main islands, has a mostly subtropical climate. It’s known for its active volcanoes, beaches and natural hot springs such as those at Beppu. Its city of Fukuoka is home to museums, mega-malls and Kushida-jinja, an 8th-century Shinto shrine. The city of Nagasaki's 1945 devastation by an atomic bomb is commemorated at the Nagasaki Peace Park and Atomic Bomb Museum.

Area: 36,753 km²
Population: 12,970,479 (2016)


Shikoku

Shikoku is the smallest of Japan’s major islands. It's encircled by a 1,200km, 88-temple Buddhist pilgrimage route (henro) honoring the 9th-century monk Kukai. Shikoku's major cities include Matsuyama, home to 8 of the pilgrimage temples, plus feudal Matsuyama Castle and Dogo Onsen, one of Japan’s earliest known hot-spring spas. The island’s mountainous interior has hiking trails and rivers with whitewater rapids.

Population: 3,845,534 (2015)
Width: 50–150 km (31–93 mi)

Religion in Japan

Shinto and Buddhism are Japan's two major religions. Shinto is as old as the Japanese culture, while Buddhism was imported from the mainland in the 6th century. Since then, the two religions have been co-existing relatively harmoniously and have even complemented each other to a certain degree. Most Japanese consider themselves Buddhist, Shintoist or both.

Religion does not play a big role in the everyday life of most Japanese people today. The average person typically follows the religious rituals at ceremonies like birth, weddings and funerals, may visit a shrine or temple on New Year and participates at local festivals (matsuri), most of which have a religious background.

Government In Japan

Japans constitution promulgated on Nov 3, 1946, replaced the Meiji Constitution of 1889. The 1946 Constitution, sponsored by the U.S during its occupation of Japan brought fundamental changes to the Japanese political system including the abandonment of the emperor's divine rights.The Diet (Parliament) consists of a house of representatives of 511 members elected for four years, and a house of Counsilors of 252 members half of whom are elected every three years.

A Paleolithic culture around 30,000 BC constitutes the first known habitation of the Japanese archipelago. This was followed from around 14,000 BC (the start of the Jōmon period) by a Mesolithic to Neolithic semi-sedentary hunter-gatherer culture characterized by pit dwelling and rudimentary agriculture, including by ancestors of contemporary Ainu people and Yamato people. The Jōmon pottery and decorated clay vessels from this period are some of the oldest surviving examples of pottery in the world.

Around 300 BC, the Yayoi people began to enter the Japanese islands, intermingling with the Jōmon. The Yayoi period, starting around 500 BC, saw the introduction of practices like wet-rice farming, a new style of pottery and metallurgy, introduced from China and Korea

On March 31, 1854, Commodore Matthew Perry and the "Black Ships" of the United States Navy forced the opening of Japan to the outside world with the Convention of Kanagawa. Subsequent similar treaties with Western countries in the Bakumatsu period brought economic and political crises. The resignation of the shōgun led to the Boshin War and the establishment of a centralized state nominally unified under the Emperor (the Meiji Restoration).

Plunging itself through an active process of Westernization during the Meiji Restoration in 1868, Japan adopted Western political, judicial and military institutions and Western cultural influences integrated with its traditional culture for modern industrialization. The Cabinet organized the Privy Council, introduced the Meiji Constitution, and assembled the Imperial Diet.

The Meiji Restoration transformed the Empire of Japan into an industrialized world power that pursued military conflict to expand its sphere of influence. Although France and Britain showed some interest, the European powers largely ignored Japan and instead concentrated on the much greater attractions of China.

France was also set back by its failures in Mexico and defeat by the Germans. After victories in the First Sino-Japanese War (1894–1895) and the Russo-Japanese War (1904–1905), Japan gained control of Taiwan, Korea and the southern half of Sakhalin. In addition to imperialistic success, Japan also invested much more heavily in its own economic growth, leading to a period of economic flourishing in the country which lasted until the Great Depression.Japan's population grew from 35 million in 1873 to 70 million by 1935.

What Is Japan's Climate Like

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The climate of Japan is predominantly temperate, but varies greatly from north to south. Japan's geographical features divide it into six principal climatic zones: Hokkaido, Sea of Japan, Central Highland, Seto Inland Sea, Pacific Ocean, and Ryukyu Islands.

The northernmost zone, Hokkaido, has a humid continental climate with long, cold winters and very warm to cool summers. Precipitation is not heavy, but the islands usually develop deep snowbanks in the winter
 
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